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Robert Millis / EyeEm(PHILADELPHIA) -- More than 30 people were injured on Tuesday after a high-speed train made contact with an unoccupied parked train outside of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, according to official with the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority. The incident happened just after midnight at a transportation terminal in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania, located about 30 minutes west of Philadelphia, a SEPTA spokesperson said.

Thirty-three people, including the train’s operator, sustained non-life-threatening injuries in the accident, according to the spokesperson.

The spokesperson did not say exactly how the trains made contact, but she said the incident involved two trains, including an inbound train on SEPTA’s Norristown High Speed line.

The incident is currently under investigation and police, medics and safety operations staff are all on scene, SEPTA officials said.

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images(FORT MYER, Va.) -- President Donald Trump announced on Monday night his administration’s plans to increase the presence of the United States military in Afghanistan, a strategy meant to combat the influence of the Taliban and the ISIS affiliate in the country that will forgo a formal timetable and instead rely upon "conditions on the ground" to guide U.S. activities.

"We must acknowledge the reality I'm here to talk about tonight, that nearly 16 years after September 11 attacks, after the extraordinary sacrifice of blood and treasure, the American people are weary of war without victory," said Trump in an address from Virginia’s Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall.

The president's announcement follows meetings with military advisers and his national security team at Camp David on Saturday. In June, he gave Secretary of Defense James Mattis the authority to set troops levels in Afghanistan, after providing the defense chief with similar authority over troop levels in Iraq and Syria.

"I have directed the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff to make preparations to carry out the president’s strategy," Mattis said Monday in a statement from Jordan, where he is traveling this week.

"I will be in consultation with the Secretary General of NATO and our allies -- several of which have also committed to increasing their troop numbers," he added. "Together, we will assist the Afghan Security Forces to destroy the terrorist hub."

Though the announcement amounts to a reversal of the position he held prior to his bid for the presidency, the addition of U.S. troops in Afghanistan comes as Trump has demonstrated a willingness to engage militarily in the region.

"My original instinct was to pull out, and historically I like following my instincts," said Trump Monday night. "But all of my life I heard that decisions are much different when you sit behind the desk in the Oval Office."

Despite official combat operations ceasing in 2014, the U.S. continues to guide and train the Afghan military, and in April dropped a 22,000 pound "mother of all bombs" on ISIS-occupied caves there.

Currently, about 8,400 American troops are stationed in Afghanistan in an advisory capacity. Several thousand U.S. personnel are also engaged in counterterror operations against al Qaeda and ISIS-Khorasan, the group’s affiliate in Afghanistan.

Trump's remarks Monday largely avoided specific details and he did not provide a number of troops that will be deployed to the country. Top U.S. military officials, including Mattis, support sending as many as 4,000 additional soldiers as part of a broader revamp of regional strategy.

"We will not talk about numbers of troops, or our plans for further military activities," said the president, later adding, "America's enemies must never know our plans, or believe they can wait us out."

"I will not say when we are going to attack, but attack we will," he said.

In February, Army Gen. John Nicholson, the top U.S. official leading the international coalition in Afghanistan, told the Senate Armed Services Committee that the mission had a “shortfall of a few thousand” troops.

In his first formal address since his speech in February to a joint session of Congress, Trump commented upon the role he expects nations in the region surrounding Afghanistan to play, placing particular emphasis on the actions of Pakistan, which he accused of "harbor[ing] terrorists."

"We can no longer be silent about Pakistan’s safe havens for terrorist organizations, the Taliban, and other groups that pose a threat to the region and beyond," he said. "Pakistan has much to gain from partnering with our effort in Afghanistan."

But while Trump promised Monday to support the armed forces with "every weapon to apply swift, decisive and overwhelming force," he also said that the U.S. commitment was "not a blank check."

"The government of Afghanistan must carry their share of the military, political, and economic burden," said the president. "The American people expect to see real reforms, real progress, and real results. Our patience is not unlimited."

The president's decision to increase the U.S. military posture in Afghanistan contrasts sharply with his position from as early as 2012, four years prior to his election, when he said with frequency on social media that the U.S. should "get out of Afghanistan" and that it has "wasted an enormous amount of blood and treasure."

How many more of our soldiers have to be shot by the Afghanis they are training? Let's get the hell out of there and focus on U.S.

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 2, 2012

We have wasted an enormous amount of blood and treasure in Afghanistan. Their government has zero appreciation. Let's get out!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) November 21, 2013

As a presidential candidate, Trump repeatedly criticized past administrations’ handling of the Afghanistan conflict, but said it would be a mistake for the U.S. to pull all troops out of the country.

“At this point, you probably have to stay because that thing will collapse about two seconds after they leave," Trump said in a CNN interview in 2015.

Less than two weeks ago, addressing the possibility of sending additional troops to the country, Trump expressed confidence in the eventual outcome, though did not yet reveal his ultimate determination on what his administration will do there.

"It's a very big decision for me," he said on August 10. "I took over a mess, and we're going to make it a lot less messy."

So far this year, 11 U.S. service members have been killed in Afghanistan. More than 2,250 Americans have died in the country since 2001.

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Wavebreak Media/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- BBC News reports Chilean constitutional court have approved a bill that would lessen regulations when it comes to abortions, a ruling that goes against a total ban.

The court ruled that abortion is justified in three cases: if the mother's life is at risk, if they fetus is not expected to survive pregnancy, if a woman was impregnated after rape.

According to BBC News, Chile had been one of seven Roman Catholic nations that ruled against abortion in any circumstance.

Judges ruled 6-4 in favor of easing on abortion laws, a welcome result for a number of groups in the South American nation.

Chile legalized abortion for medical reasons in 1931, according to BBC News, but banned it completely in 1989 under the country's then-military government.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The narrative and goals for what has become America’s longest war have shifted in the past 16 years, and they may take a new turn Monday night, as President Donald Trump is expected to announce his policy approach for Afghanistan.

The war started in October 2001 in the wake of the September 11th attacks, under then-President George W. Bush, and after Obama, Trump is now the second president to inherit -- and have to make a decision on how to handle -- the ongoing conflict.

When Bush first announced the military action on Oct. 7, 2001, he described “strikes against al Qaeda terrorist training camps and military installations of the Taliban regime in Afghanistan.”

"These carefully targeted actions are designed to disrupt the use of Afghanistan as a terrorist base of operations, and to attack the military capability of the Taliban regime,” Bush said in an address from the Treaty Room of the White House.

The timing of the military action is key, as Bush’s announcement came 27 days after coordinates terror attacks that killed nearly 3,000 people in the U.S.

"The very original reason and the impetus was 9/11,” said Vanda Felbab-Brown, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, She notes how the belief that “the Taliban was sheltering al Qaeda” drove the focus on Afghanistan specifically.

"The counterterrorism objective became the dominant principle reason for the effort in Afghanistan,” she added.

Felbab-Brown summarized the Bush team’s initial approach as being, simply put, that they would “’just topple the Taliban and get out’… hence the minimal design of the original operations, the minimal force approach that [then-Secretary of Defense Donald] Rumsfeld promoted.”

"But very quickly, even the George W. [Bush] administration realized that this was problematic -- that it wasn’t just enough to topple the Taliban, and that it had to leave behind some sort of stable government. But both the W. administration and the Obama administration, and now the Trump administration have been debating that: what is required of the counter terrorism objective,” she said.

Expanding the goals

Part of the problem has been that the role of the counterterrorism objective expanded, Felbab-Brown said, noting how "a lot of other interests were added as the mission was developing."

One such addition was the fight for and promotion of women's rights in Afghanistan, a cause that became a big part of then-first lady Laura Bush's agenda. She gave the president's weekly radio address on Nov. 17, 2001, on the topic, and it coincided with the release of a report titled "Report on the Taliban's War Against Women" by the State Department's Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor.

"Afghan women know, through hard experience, what the rest of the world is discovering: the brutal oppression of women is a central goal of the terrorists," Laura Bush said in her radio address.

"Civilized people throughout the world are speaking out in horror -- not only because our hearts break for the women and children in Afghanistan, but also because in Afghanistan we see the world the terrorists would like to impose on the rest of us," she said.

”Not a war of choice”

The theme of the obligation of the war in Afghanistan was seen in speeches by both Bush and Obama. Even in his original Oct. 7 address, Bush said "we did not ask for this mission, but we will fulfill it.”

A similar sentiment was echoed by Obama eight years later, when he called it a war of necessity during a speech to a Veterans of Foreign Wars group.

"We must never forget: this is not a war of choice. This is a war of necessity. Those who attacked America on 9/11 are plotting to do so again. If left unchecked, the Taliban insurgency will mean an even larger safe haven from which Al Qaeda would plot to kill more Americans,” Obama said in an Aug. 17, 2009, speech. “So this is not only a war worth fighting. This is fundamental to the defense of our people.”

Felbab-Brown notes that this speech was in keeping with a larger contrast that Obama painted between Afghanistan and Iraq, indication that the conflict in Afghanistan is necessary, while the one in Iraq is “the bad war,” she said.

"[Obama] wanted to get out” of Afghanistan, Felbab-Brown said, adding that “he tried” but was unable to, largely because the question of what the goal of the counterterrorism operation was lingered.

"The core interest is still the counterterrorism objective, but how one goes about achieving it has been a major source of debate for W., Obama and now Trump,” she said.

Trump’s exact plans have been unknown since he took office. Because of his lack of specifics on the issue in the past, it is not exactly clear what changes – if any – are called for.

"During the campaign, Trump spoke almost not at all about Afghanistan. It was a non-issue,” she said.

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Netflix/Jessica Miglio(NEW YORK) -- Just three days after its latest Marvel series, The Defenders, went live on Netflix, the streaming network released a trailer for its next effort, The Punisher.

Spun off from the second season of its hit Daredevil series, The Punisher again features fan favorite Jon Bernthal as one of Marvel's most popular heroes: former elite soldier Frank Castle, who uses his skills to mercilessly hunt down criminals of every stripe after his family was murdered.  

In the sneak peek, Castle takes a sledgehammer to a concrete floor, perhaps to unearth a weapons cache.

"All the things that I'd done," Castle says in a gravelly voiceover. "Memories, they never hurt me. But the past is more than memories. It's the Devil you sold your soul to. He's coming. He's coming to collect."

Netflix's announcement notes, "After exacting revenge on those responsible for the death of his wife and children, Frank Castle uncovers a conspiracy that runs far deeper than New York’s criminal underworld. Now known throughout the city as The Punisher, he must discover the truth about injustices that affect more than his family alone."

As for when we'll see the series, all we know is sometime this year.

Count Charlie Cox, who plays Daredevil, as an eager fan. He told ABC Radio of seeing Bernthal in action again: "I'm excited about that. I'm excited to watch that as a fanboy, you know?"

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Allen Kee/ESPN Images(NEW YORK) -- The National Football League and its commissioner Roger Goodell are close to agreeing on a new five-year extension that runs through 2024, according to ESPN. The deal was first reported by the Sports Business Journal.

ESPN's Adam Schefter says while a deal is likely, talks have not progressed as expected due to some issues with the deal.

ESPN reports Goodell made $32 million during the 2015 fiscal year, citing the league's 2015 tax filing, and has surpassed $200 million since becoming commissioner in 2006.

An extension would mark the third time in Goodell's tenure that the league has agreed to rework his deal. He was extended in 2009 and again in 2012.

Goodell's current deal expires in 2019.

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Purestock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Here is a recap of this week's episode of "What Would You Do?" with ABC's John Quiñones.

What would you do: Shopping while transgender

A transgender woman is shopping for a dress at a women’s boutique. The sales clerk refuses to sell clothes to her because she is transgender. How will the other customers react? Watch what happens:

What would you do: Pedi harassment

A nail technician discriminates against a woman for being overweight, charging her extra money simply based on her size. Will anyone say something to the technician? Watch what happens:

What would you do: Baby or bag

A mother has been shopping excessively, spending nearly all her cash on shoes and clothes. She has just enough money for groceries for the week, but then spots one more outfit she would like to purchase. Her daughter tries to stop her but she is determined. What will the other shoppers say? Watch what happens:

What would you do: Overprotective mom

A mother is with her son at a sporting goods store. She is trying to buy the son a new pair of soccer cleats, when the son sees a pair of football cleats. He tells his mom he wants to play football instead, and she immediately shuts the idea down. Mom cites the health concerns regarding the sport, especially given the recent attention paid to CTE, caused by repeated blows to the head. The son tries to plead with the mom, but she isn’t budging. Will any of the other customers interject? Watch what happens:

What would you do: The breakup

A guy is breaking up with his girlfriend of one year while on a park bench. He is being loud, and his girlfriend is clearly distraught. As she sits there crying, will anyone try to console her? Watch what happens:

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