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David McNew/Getty Images(SANTA ROSA, Calif.) -- A possibly weary contracted driver of a water truck helping to fight California's wildfires died Monday morning after his truck veered off the road and rolled over, officials said.

The unidentified man was driving a water tender, also known as a tanker, that can supply thousands of gallons of water to firefighters.

He was driving into Napa Valley's Robert Mondavi Winery to help battle blazes when he apparently lost control of the car, a California fire official confirmed to ABC News.

"Fatigue is [potentially] a factor," the official said.

His death comes after fire officials in California said they "turned a corner" on what has been one of the deadliest outbreaks of wildfires ever to hit the state.

"Conditions have drastically changed from just 24 hours ago, and that is definitely a very good sign," said Daniel Berlant, spokesman for the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, on Sunday. "It's probably a sign we've turned a corner on these fires," he said, noting that some of the fires were 50 percent or more contained.

"A week ago this started as a nightmare, and the day we dreamed of has arrived," Napa County Supervisor Belia Ramos said Sunday.

Officials warned, however, that 14 large fires are still not fully contained and remain dangerous.

So far, 40,000 people have been evacuated. Officials said thousands of displaced residents are being permitted to return home to areas deemed safe.

The blazes have raged out of control for over a week, killing at least 41. In Sonoma County, 88 people remain unaccounted for, officials said Monday afternoon. Nearly 700 are in shelters in Santa Rosa, which is a part of the county.

They have destroyed some 5,700 homes and other buildings and charred more than 213,000 acres, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

Santa Rosa, a city of 175,000 in Sonoma County, was among the hardest-hit areas, with at least 2,834 homes, businesses and other buildings destroyed there. Critical infrastructure was also lost in the flames, including the city's fire station, according to Santa Rosa Mayor Chris Coursey.

Emergency vehicles have since returned to Santa Rosa police headquarters so crews can recuperate, and forecasters predict that Santa Rosa could get a dose of rain by Thursday.

The glimmer of hope in the fire-ravaged Wine Country comes after emergency personnel carried out mandatory evacuations in northern California on Saturday and as firefighters fought what had been 16 large wildfires around the state that authorities say leveled entire neighborhoods.

But as northern California's Diablo Winds die down, and fires get tamed as weather brings possible precipitation, southern California is seeing its Santa Ana winds starting to gain strength.

As a result, officials have placed areas in the southern part of the state under extreme fire weather warnings.

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- In a wide-ranging, impromptu press conference from the White House Rose Garden Monday, President Donald Trump -- joined by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell -- addressed a number of his administration's current goals as well as ongoing controversies.

For over 30 minutes, Trump touched on the rumors of his rocky relationship with fellow Republicans, his action to halt Obamacare subsidy payments, the response to Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico, the nation's opioid epidemic, his former rival Hillary Clinton, the NFL national anthem protests and the ambush on U.S. soldiers in Niger, among other issues.

Trump and McConnell ate lunch together with Vice President Mike Pence at the White House earlier in the day, but the press conference was not listed on his daily schedule.

Here are some of the key moments from the appearance:

Trump-McConnell relationship

Trump claimed that his relationship with McConnell is "outstanding," a refutation of reports ranging back to the summer that documented growing frustrations between the two powerful Republicans.

After first discussing his administration's current efforts at tax reform, the president suddenly pivoted to describe his rapport with the senator.

"My relationship with this gentleman is outstanding [and] has been outstanding." Trump said.

McConnell later echoed Trump's sentiment and directly pushed back on the rumors of discord.

"I think what the president and I would both like to say to you today, contrary to what some of you may have reported, we are together totally on this agenda to move America forward," he said.

Opioid national emergency, investigation into Rep. Marino

Trump said that next week, his administration plans on declaring a national emergency to combat the opioid epidemic.

“We're going to be doing that next week,” Trump said. “It's a very important step, and to get to that step a lot of work has to be done and it's time consuming work.”

Trump said he watched a special investigation by “60 Minutes” and the Washington Post that examined Congress’ role in the exacerbating the opioid crisis. The investigation pointed a finger at Rep. Tom Marino, R-Pa., as spearheadeding efforts to pass a bill that makes it harder for the Drug Enforcement Agency to halt suspicious shipments of drugs. Marino is currently the Trump administration’s nominee to lead the Office of National Drug Control Policy. After viewing the report, Trump says he will be reconsidering his nomination.

“He was a very early supporter of mine from the great state of Pennsylvania,” Trump said. “He's a great guy. I'll look at the report and take it very seriously because we will have a major announcement probably next week on the drug crisis and on the opioid massive problem and I want to get that absolutely right.”

“This country, and frankly the world, has a drug problem,” Trump added. “The world has a drug problem and we have it and we'll do something about it and I'll have a major announcement on the drug problem next week. We'll be looking into Tom.”

Russia investigation

As Special Counsel Robert Mueller continues his nearly five-month-long investigation into Russian meddling in last year's presidential election, Trump shared his impatience with the inquiry and continued to downplay the notion of interference.

"I'd like to see it end," Trump said of the investigation. "The whole Russian thing was an excuse for the Democrats losing the election."

In January, a report by the U.S. intelligence agencies concluded that Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered an effort to undermine the U.S. election. Trump has, at times, alternated between accepting that conclusion, suggesting that other parties could have taken part in the interference, and calling the situation a "hoax." He strongly denied Monday that his campaign was in any way connected to the situation.

"There has been absolutely no collusion," Trump said. "It's been stated that they have no collusion. They ought to get to the end of it, because I think the American public is sick of it."

Niger ambush response

Almost two weeks after four Green Berets were killed in an attack in Niger, the Trump administration has faced criticism over its response. On Monday, Trump said he plans to call the families of the fallen soldiers to offer his condolences. But he also falsely claimed that former President Barack Obama and other presidents did not make personal calls to bereaved military families.

“The traditional way, if you look at President Obama and other presidents, most of them didn't make calls. Lot of them didn't make calls. I like to call when it's appropriate, when I think I'm able to do it. They have made the ultimate sacrifice. So generally I would say that I like to call,” Trump said.

Trump said he plans to call and send letters out to the families “either today or tomorrow.”

When challenged by a reporter, Trump walked back his response.

“I was told that he didn't often. Lot of presidents don't,” Trump said. “President Obama, I think, probably did sometimes. Maybe sometimes he didn't. I don't know. That's what I was told. All I can do is ask my generals. Other presidents did not call. They'd write letters. Some presidents didn't do anything. But I like the combination.”

Former Obama advisers were quick to offer backlash.

This is an outrageous and disrespectful lie even by Trump standards. Also: Obama never attacked a Gold Star family. https://t.co/JgzTUIzWIa

— Ben Rhodes (@brhodes) October 16, 2017

Hillary Clinton and NFL protests

After tweeting Monday morning that he was recently asked if he thought Hillary Clinton would run for president again in 2020 and that he "hope[s] so," Trump repeated the position when his former Democratic rival was invoked in relation to the NFL national anthem protests.

"I hope Hillary runs. Hillary, please run again," the president urged after her name was mentioned in the Rose Garden.

Clinton has taken the position that professional football players have the right to kneel during the national anthem in protest of racial injustice, and that the action is not necessarily one that demeans the flag or the U.S. military. Trump has repeatedly called attention to the protests and has said that the NFL should institute a rule forcing players to stand.

"I think she's wrong," Trump said, adding, "It's that thinking -- that is the reason she lost the election. When you go down and take a knee, or any other way, you're sitting, essentially, for our great national anthem. You're disrespecting our flag and disrespecting our country."

"If Hillary Clinton actually made the statement that... sitting down during the playing of our great national anthem is not disrespectful, then I fully understand why she didn't win," he continued. "There are a lot of reasons she didn't win, including the fact that she was not good at what she did."

Taking on health care and the pharmaceutical industry

Last week, Trump made two major announcements about the Affordable Care Act -- his plans not to continue funding cost sharing reduction (CSR) payments, which help insurance companies pay for subsidies that benefit the poor, and his executive order that would pave the way for association health plans and expand short term limited duration plans.

“Obamacare is a wreck. It's a mess and destroying lives,” Trump said. “I want to get health care that's much more affordable and much better healthcare and that's what we're doing.”

Still, Trump said he and McConnell are working on a complete repeal and replace.

“We will come up in the early to mid-part of next year and we will have a vote. We feel confident we have the votes and we know what the plan is. I believe Republicans and Democrats are working together very hard right now to do an intermediate short-term plan because Obamacare is a disaster,” said Trump.

Trump said he next plans to take on the pharmaceutical industry.

“We're going to get the costs way down,” Trump said. “We are going to get drug prices and prescription drug crisis way down because the world is taking advantage of us. The world is taking advantage of us when this happens so that will be very important.”


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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The major indexes closed at record highs on Monday with large gains in financials.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average climbed 85.24 ( 0.37 percent) to finish at 22,956.96.

The Nasdaq gained 18.20 ( 0.28 percent) to close at 6,624.00, while the S&P 500 finished at 2,557.64, up 4.47 ( 0.18 percent) from its open.

Crude oil was about 0.76 percent higher with prices at about $52 per barrel.

Winners and Losers: Shares of JPMorgan Chase jumped 2.07 percent.  The financial services company announced Monday it would use blockchain technology in a new global payments process.

News of Sears investor Bruce Berkowitz's departure from the board caused shares of Sears Holdings Corp to tumble 11.52 percent.

Apple's stock climbed 1.84 percent after getting an upgrade from KeyBanc Capital.

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iStock/Thinkstock(SAN DIEGO) -- As California finds itself in the grips of the largest person-to-person hepatitis A outbreak in more than two decades, health officials are taking emergency measures to curb the spread of the deadly disease.

On Friday, California Governor Jerry Brown declared a State of Emergency in light of the outbreak that has killed at least 18 people, hospitalized 386 and infected at least 578 in the state as of this past weekend, according to the California Department of Public Health (CDPH).

"This outbreak is different than any other we have seen in the United States in the past decade," said Dr. Matt Zahn, medical director of epidemiology at the Orange County Health Care Agency. "Previously, we have seen outbreaks that are food-borne, with a direct exposure to that food source. Ongoing person-to person spread is really not something we have seen in recent years."

Also unique about this outbreak is that the homeless population and illicit drug users are the hardest hit.

Hepatitis A is a vaccine-preventable disease, and the Governor’s state of emergency proclamation has given the CDPH the authority to directly purchase vaccines from manufacturers in order to quickly distribute them to the community.

“The key is to bring the vaccination directly to the communities at risk,” Zahn said. “This population is not easy to reach, so we make interventions to bring it to them. San Diego has done a marvelous job to have their staff go out to the homeless community, individual by individual, and offer the vaccine then and there.”

The outbreaks are affecting multiple counties in California, with the San Diego Jurisdiction bearing 490 infected cases. Since early spring, more than 80,000 vaccine doses have been distributed to the public and some municipalities have purchased their own supplies. San Diego County said it has administered more than 68,500 vaccines since the outbreak began.

Sanitation and hygiene are other important aspects of controlling the spread of hepatitis A, which is spread through fecal matter. Since the outbreak began in the spring, more than 100 hand washing stations have been have been installed in the area, most of which are in the city of San Diego. The city is also power-washing areas affected public areas with bleach solutions and making public bathrooms more available in areas most frequented by the homeless.

Below are answers to commonly asked questions about this disease.

How is Hepatitis A spread?

Since this virus spreads through the feces, outbreaks are most commonly seen in the presence of unsanitary conditions or behaviors. Food workers can spread the virus if they do not properly wash their hands after using the bathroom and caregivers can transmit the virus after changing the diaper of an infected baby.

Hepatitis A can spread by simply touching objects, or through contaminated food or drinks. People may also be infected by eating uncooked food that has been contaminated, sexual contact with an infected person and travel to a country where Hepatitis A is common. The virus can be spread to others before any symptoms are apparent.

What are symptoms of Hepatitis A?

The hepatitis A virus causes inflammation of the liver. Symptoms of infection include fever, fatigue, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. Yellowing of the skin and eyes, also know has jaundice, is also a possible symptom of this virus.

Hepatitis A is an acute infection, with symptoms persisting for up to two months; rare cases may last longer. The virus does not typically lead to chronic infection or death, but it can prove fatal to those with compromised livers or immune systems.

How to protect against the virus

The best way to prevent getting Hepatitis A is through vaccination, given in a two-dose series, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

The vaccine is especially recommended for those at particularly increased risk, such as people with chronic liver disease, blood clotting disorders, men who have sex with men, those traveling to areas known to have the virus, such as parts of Africa and Asia, and those who could be in direct contact with people infected with hepatitis A, like health care workers.

The virus can live for months outside of the body on objects and surfaces, according to the CDC, and it can be difficult to kill.

“Hepatitis A is a hardy virus, and can certainly stay on surfaces and in the environment [for a long time],” Zahn said. Importantly, most waterless hand sanitizers and some household cleaners are not effective in destroying the virus. So when it comes to preventing spread, washing hands thoroughly and regularly with soap and water is the best bet. Using bleach-based cleaning products is the most effective to clean surfaces in a way that eliminates the hepatitis A virus.

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Mike Marsland/WireImage via Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Russian "trolls" working for a company that allegedly used fake social-media accounts to try to influence U.S. voters in the 2016 election were required to watch the political thriller TV show "House of Cards" to increase their understanding of American politics, according to an interview broadcast in Russia.

In an interview aired Sunday by independent Russian station TV Rain, a man identified only as "Maksim" says he worked for the English-language department of a so-called "troll factory" that U.S. officials say was involved in an information campaign on American social media during the election.

Maksim, who said he worked for the company around 18 months and quit in early 2015, said his department was tasked with stirring up dissatisfaction against the U.S. government and harming the election chances of Democrat Hillary Clinton by writing in the comment sections of major American media outlets, such as The New York Times and The Washington Post. He said they tried to drive discussion toward specific topics, such as past alleged scandals around the former secretary of state and her husband, former President Bill Clinton.

"About her it was always bad," said Maksim, whose face was concealed during the broadcast. "The basic message was: 'Aren't you tired, my American brothers, of the Clintons?'"

He added that more broadly "our goal was to set Americans against their government ... to provoke riots, to provoke dissatisfaction. There was a goal to influence opinion, to drive the discussion."

The troll factory, located in an innocuous-looking building on the edge of St. Petersburg's city center, first attracted wide notice after a 2015 article in The New York Times magazine said the company's workers were pumping out pro-Kremlin messaging on social media and comment sections largely for a Russian-speaking audience. The article said the company has gone by different names but is best known as the Internet Research Agency.

Attention has focused on the company again since Facebook said last month that the Internet Research Agency spent $100,000 on U.S. political ads on the social network during the 2016 election.

Facebook handed over 3,000 ads it said purchased by the company to the Senate and House intelligence committees that are investigating Russia’s alleged interference in the election. The ads were purchased between June 2015 and May 2017, according to Facebook.

Maksim told TV Rain his department had been ordered to study American media to identify divisive topics. Employees were told to read through thousands of posts in the comments sections of U.S. news outlets before commenting themselves, Maksim said, with success measured in how many "likes" a post attracted from other users.

“You had to know all the basic problems of the United States of America. Tax problems, problems with the gays, sexual minorities, weapons,” he said. Inserting crude comments about homosexual men, he said, was viewed as a reliable technique for attracting "likes."

Employees were required to watch "House of Cards" as a way to learn about American politics and to improve their English.

“At the beginning, they made us watch 'House of Cards' in English,” Maksim said.

He said he and others in his department were ordered not to refer to Russia in their posts or to try to promote Moscow's viewpoint.

"We didn't have the goal to turn Americans toward Russia," he said. "You couldn't mention Russia, nor Putin. Because Americans don't talk about that. They basically don't care about Russia and Putin."

Maksim's account follows reports from Facebook, an independent Russian journalist and comments from one of the leaders of the Senate Intelligence Committee about the Internet Research Agency.

Facebook told congressional investigators that the Internet Research Agency was especially busy during the U.S. 2016 campaign.

The social media giant’s chief security officer, Alex Stamos, said in a post on Facebook that most of the posts on his company's network that appear to have been connected to Russia did not mention a specific presidential candidate or the election, but focused on “amplifying divisive social and political messages” on immigration, gun rights and LGBT issues.

Roger McNamee, a venture capitalist and early investor in Facebook, told ABC News the Russian effort may have started as merely an attempt to sow discontent, but as the campaign unfolded, he said it became clear the effort grew increasingly focused.

“Classic Russian intelligence techniques of taking the most extreme voices and amplifying them,” he said. “It was the perfect petri dish for this kind of campaign.

Sen. Mark Warner of Virginia, the top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee, told ABC News last month that based on the Facebook ads he'd seen at that point it was clear the posts included divisive messages intended to “help one candidate and potentially hurt another.” He said the ads clearly appeared to be part of a broader effort that the U.S. intelligence community has determined was designed to aid Donald Trump and hurt Hillary Clinton in the election.

Independent Russian journalist Lyudmila Savchuk, who worked for the Internet Research Agency in 2015 to expose what the factory was doing, told ABC News that young Russians posed as Americans online, working 12-hour shifts at the company’s headquarters posting comments on U.S. political issues selected by their bosses. Facebook, she said, was one of their primary platforms.

“'Troll factory' is a very appropriate name for it because it really is a large-scale production that works around the clock, and they don't take time off for holidays, lunch nor sleep,” she said. “A huge quantity of content is being produced.”

Maksim said in the Russian TV interview that when people in his department commented on U.S. news sites, they would use VPNs — virtual private networks — that disguise a computer’s real location. Those employees who failed to conceal themselves were punished, he said.

TV Rain said that Maksim had shown the station a document certifying his employment for Internet Research Agency as proof he had worked there.

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Getty Images/Pierre Suu(LOS ANGELES) -- A 2005 red carpet interview with Courtney Love has resurfaced online following numerous allegations of sexual harassment or assault against movie mogul Harvey Weinstein.

In the clip, posted by TMZ, Love is asked what advice she has for young women moving to Hollywood. After hesitating -- "I'll get libeled if I say it," she says -- the musician and actress warns, "If Harvey Weinstein invites you to a private party in the Four Seasons [hotel], don't go."

In response to the video resurfacing, Love tweeted, "Although I wasn't one of his victims, I was eternally banned by [talent agency] CAA for speaking out against #HarveyWeinstein #rape."

Weinstein's been accused of sexual misconduct by a growing list of women, including actresses Ashley Judd, Gwyneth Paltrow and Angelina Jolie.

As more women continue to speak out about their experiences with Weinstein and sexual abuse in the film industry, Bjork now says that she was sexually harassed by a "Danish director" while working on a movie.

"It was extremely clear to me when I walked into the actresses profession that my humiliation and role as a lesser sexually harassed being was the norm and set in stone with the director and a staff of dozens who enabled it and encouraged it," Bjork wrote in a Facebook post.

"When I turned the director down repeatedly he sulked and punished me and created for his team an impressive net of illusion where I was framed as the difficult one," she added.

Since the filmmaker was characterized as a "Danish director," many believe Bjork was referring to Lars von Trier, with whom she worked on the 2000 film Dancer in the Dark. An assistant for von Trier told Rolling Stone, "Lars declines the accusations Bjork has made, but doesn't wish to comment any further."

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Brandon Wade/Getty Images(SANTA ROSA, CA.) -- A young Santa Rosa resident wrote an emotional letter to his favorite professional baseball team, the Oakland Athletics, after his home burned to the ground along with all of his favorite sports memorabilia.

Nine-year-old Loren Jaden Smith wrote to the team:

"I love watching your A's games... I want to be an A's player and I play at Mark West Little League in Santa Rosa. I played baseball in my backyard all day loving the A's and making up my own game. In my backyard they won six World Series in a row. But my house burned down in the Santa Rosa fire and my saddest things were my baseball collection cards... my 17 jerseys and 10 hats and my baseball from the game and also a ball signed by the whole team and Rickey Henderson and Bob Melvin. I am 9-years-old and I had a major league baseball and it all burned up... so sad. I know you are not all together but hope they get this."

Young @Athletics fan pens heartbreaking letter to team after losing all of his baseball memorabilia in the #NorthBayFires #abc7now pic.twitter.com/5dNDt5PLkY

— Katie Utehs (@KatieUtehs) October 15, 2017

ABC News affiliate KGO-TV in San Francisco met Loren's family in the wake of the wildfire and tweeted a photo of his letter to the Athletics and the team's president, Dave Kaval.

"This is so touching. So sad to hear about their loss. We would be happy to completely outfit the family in new Athletics gear," Kaval replied to the post.

"It breaks my heart just that he is not going to be back here screaming and yelling home runs that he hit over the fence with the whiffle ball to the neighbors," the boy's father Tait Smith, told KGO, referring to the yard of the family's destroyed home.

Retired A's pitcher Dan Haren reached out on Twitter offering to help the boy's family.

A spokeswoman for the A's said that a meeting between the family and the team has been set for later this week and will likely include a few surprises.

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