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Chicago Police(CHICAGO) -- A Northwestern University professor, as he allegedly stabbed his boyfriend whom prosecutors say he couldn't subdue, yelled for a second man to help him, according to a court document detailing the alleged murder.

Wyndham Lathem, a faculty member at Northwestern until he was fired this month after the alleged crime, and the second suspect, Andrew Warren, spent more than a week on the run together after, police say, they killed Lathem's boyfriend, Trenton Cornell-Duranleau.

Cornell-Duranleau, 26, was found stabbed to death at Lathem's Chicago apartment July 27. Both suspects were taken into custody in California Aug. 4 after a nationwide manhunt.

The suspects have not been arraigned to face a formal charge but the court document cites first-degree murder. Their attorneys say they are innocent.

Police Sunday described the crime scene as "savage and grisly."

Here are some of the details of the crime, according to the court document from the Cook County State's Attorney's Office:

Lathem, who lived in Chicago, and Warren, who lived in England, had allegedly communicated in an internet chatroom "about carrying out their sexual fantasies of killing others and then themselves."

Lathem allegedly paid for Warren to come to the United States for them to kill someone and then each other, and a few days before July 27, Lathem met Warren at Chicago's O'Hare airport. Lathem allegedly rented a room for Warren near his apartment.

On July 26, Lathem allegedly lured the victim to his apartment while texting Warren that they would kill him that night.

After Cornell-Duranleau went to sleep, Lathem texted Warren and told him to come over, and Lathem allegedly gave Warren a cellphone and told him to record the killing.

After Lathem allegedly stabbed his boyfriend repeatedly in the neck and chest, the victim woke up and began to scream and fight back.

Lathem allegedly couldn't control the victim and yelled to Warren to help him.

"Warren walked into the bedroom and placed his hands over the victim’s mouth to stop him from screaming. The victim bit defendant Warren’s hand and flailed his arms in the struggle," the court document said. "To silence the victim and stop him from moving, defendant Warren struck the victim in the head with a heavy metal lamp."

Both suspects stabbed the victim, the document said, alleging that "Warren used so much force on the victim that he broke the blade of one of the knives he used."

The court document said the victim’s last words to Lathem were, "Wyndham, what are you doing?"

While the victim bled to death in the bedroom, the suspects showered and tried to clean up the scene, the document said.

The document said a car was rented in Lathem’s name and that he left an anonymous cash donation of $5,610 at the Howard Brown Health Center in the victim's name.

The court document said after the suspects fled Chicago, Lathem "called the front desk of his apartment building and told front desk security that apartment 1004 should be checked, there had been a crime committed in that room."

Responding authorities found that the victim had been stabbed 70 times and his head was nearly decapitated, the court document said.

While the suspects were on the run, Lathem sent a video message to his parents and to friends, admitting "that he killed the victim and that the murder was not an accident," but saying, "he is not the person people thought he was," according to the court document.

"He admitted that the victim trusted him completely and felt safe with him but that he betrayed that trust," the document said.

The defendants at one point fled to Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, where Lathem went to the Lake Geneva public library and made a $1,000 cash donation to the library in the victim's name, the document said.

Lathem's attorney, Barry Sheppard, told ABC News today, "We are representing a brilliant scientist who at this point we believe is innocent."

Sheppard said Lathem has not yet entered a plea but plans to plead not guilty.

Sheppard said "we don't accept the facts" presented in the court document, adding, "we are conducting our own independent investigation that will differ substantially from the [court document]."

Sheppard said no arraignment date has been set.

Once in custody, Warren allegedly admitted to helping Lathem in the killing, and when asked whether there were any other potential victims, Warren allegedly said there were but said he did not know if that person showed up at Lathem's apartment the next morning after they fled the crime scene.

Warren allegedly demonstrated for officers how he and Lathem stabbed the victim and Warren said he did not record the killing on the cellphone, the court document said.

Kulmeet Galhotra of the Cook County Public Defender's office, which is representing Warren, told ABC News today that Warren is "presumed innocent. And we have just been appointed, so we're going to begin our investigation of the case."

"I anticipate that in a few weeks there will be an arraignment at which he will be entering a plea of not guilty," he said.

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ABC News(STEUBENVILLE, Ohio) -- A judge in Ohio underwent surgery after he was shot in an ambush-style attack outside a courthouse this morning, authorities said.

Judge Joseph J. Bruzzese Jr. was shot and injured outside the Jefferson County courthouse in Steubenville, Ohio, after a suspect ran up to him and started shooting, Jefferson County Sheriff Fred Abdalla said.

Steubenville city manager James Mavromatis told ABC News a probation officer returned fire.

The suspect died at the scene, Abdalla said.

"He's shooting and shooting," Abdalla said at a news conference. "He's right up to the judge. And that's when he fires another round and he shoved the judge over and then he takes off running towards his vehicle."

The judge's condition was not immediately clear, Mavromatis said.

"This individual laid in wait, for our judge, and ... it just hurts. First thing on a Monday morning," the sheriff said emotionally. "You have a judge shot in front of his courthouse, and that affected me. ... This was ambush and attempted murder on our judge."

"Thank God he's not that good a shot," the sheriff said.

Abdalla said a passenger in the man's car is not considered a suspect at this time but is being questioned.

"He didn't get out of the car," Abdalla said. "Supposedly according to him, he wasn't aware what this guy was going to do."

The courthouse was closed until further notice, according to the sheriff's office.

The Ohio Bureau of Criminal Investigation assigned its special investigations, crime scene and cyber units to the investigation, Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine said in a statement.

DeWine added that he and his wife "are praying for Judge Bruzzese and his family at this difficult time."

This story is developing. Please check back for more updates

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ABC News.(NEW YORK) -- A historic total solar eclipse arced across the United States from west to east Monday, as millions of people who had gathered in its relatively narrow "path of totality" watched in awe.

The total solar eclipse, which is the first to traverse the continental United States in decades, first made contact over Lincoln City, Oregon. Crowds of people donning special-purpose solar filters cheered and roared as the moon completely blocked the sun and cast a 70-mile wide shadow stretching from Oregon to South Carolina.

For brief moments, the sky over various U.S. cities plunged into darkness and temperatures dropped as much as 12 degrees. The sun's outer atmosphere, which is usually obscured by glare, appeared as a ring of ethereal white wisps around the moon while it blocked the solar surface.

In areas with clear skies, bright stars and planets appeared in the darkened daytime sky. And as the sun reemerged from behind the moon, it created an astonishing "diamond ring" effect.

A total solar eclipse is when the moon moves between the sun and Earth, an occurrence that lasts up to three hours from beginning to end. Monday's total solar eclipse is particularly rare because it's the first time in 99 years that the path of totality exclusively crosses the continental United States from coast to coast. It's also the first continent-wide eclipse to be visible only from the United States since 1776.

The last time the contiguous United States saw a total solar eclipse was Feb. 26, 1979, when the path of totality crossed the Pacific Northwest. ABC News' Frank Reynolds anchored a special report on the celestial phenomenon at the time and pledged that the network would cover the next total solar eclipse in 2017.

“So that’s it -- the last solar eclipse to be seen on this continent in this century. And as I said not until Aug. 21, 2017, will another eclipse be visible from North America. That’s 38 years from now. May the shadow of the moon fall on a world in peace. ABC News, of course, will bring you a complete report on that next eclipse 38 years from now,” Reynolds said before signing off.

From 10 a.m. PT/1 p.m. ET to 1 p.m. PT/3 p.m. ET, ABC News' David Muir will lead the network's live coverage of the astronomical event from within the path of totality.

You must be in the path of totality to witness a total solar eclipse. NASA estimates more than 300 million people in the United States could potentially view the total solar eclipse in its entirety.

However, a partial solar eclipse will be visible in every U.S. state. In fact, everyone in North America, as well as parts of South America, Africa and Europe, will see at least a partial eclipse, according to NASA.

The path of totality for Monday's solar eclipse is a 70-mile-wide ribbon that will cross the United States from west to east, sweeping over portions of 14 U.S. states: Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Montana, Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina.

The moon's shadow started to eclipse the sun over the West Coast just after 9 a.m. PT. From there, it will speed across the country and leave the East Coast just after 4 p.m. ET.

The exact times for partial and total phases of Monday's eclipse vary depending on your location.

With millions of people pouring into the select U.S. cities located within the path of totality, law enforcement, emergency personnel and hospitals there are on high alert.

"It's all hands on deck," Kentucky's Madisonville Police Chief Wade Williams told ABC News. "We're kind of throwing everything at it."

The state of Oregon alone anticipated a million visitors Monday, causing some local hospitals to cancel elective surgeries and call in extra help for the emergency rooms. Some cities even preemptively declared a state of disaster, a move that allows them to call in the National Guard to help direct the large crowds if needed.

"If a police department in a certain area is overwhelmed and they need us to help come and set up traffic control check points, we're ready to do that," Oregon National Guard spokesperson Leslie Reed told ABC News.

More than than 17,000 cars and SUVs were rented for Monday at Oregon's Portland International Airport, a number it normally hits over an entire week.

In northeast Georgia, the mountain town of Blairsville expected to host up to 200 percent more people than the number of residents who live there. The town's hotels were fully booked and camping sites were sold out for Monday.

"There is no reason to panic," Blairsville-Union County Chamber of Commerce tourism director Tobie Chandler told ABC News. "We are not going to run out of gas, we are not going to run out of groceries. We just need to enjoy this event."

The American Red Cross has set up resources along the path of totality to help keep people safe during Monday's rare celestial event.

"One thing is we really encourage folks to have in their cars an emergency go kit and that should include things like water, non-perishable foods, a flashlight with batteries and an envelope with cash," Josh Lockwood, regional CEO for the American Red Cross Greater New York region, told ABC News.

Authorities warned that people might have to look for landlines in some areas to make emergency phone calls, as some small towns may not be able to handle the large number of cellphone calls.

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ABC News(AUSTIN, Texas) -- The University of Texas at Austin is removing four Confederate monuments that it says have become symbols of modern white supremacy and neo-Nazism, the school announced on Sunday.

The university said the monuments -- which honor four figures tied to the Confederacy -- were erected during the period of segregation and “represent the subjugation of African Americans” and therefore should be taken down.

The statues -- which depict confederate generals Robert E. Lee and Albert Sidney Johnston, former U.S. Sen. John Reagan and former Texas Governor James Stephen Hogg -- were taken down early Monday morning.

The news comes in the wake of a deadly outbreak of violence in Charlottesville, Virginia -- which began in protest of the planned removal of a monument of Confederate General Robert E. Lee -- that left one dead and 19 injured after a car-ramming attack. Police arrested James Alex Fields, 20, and charged him with second-degree murder in the incident.

“Last week, the horrific displays of hatred at the University of Virginia and in Charlottesville shocked and saddened the nation,” University of Texas at Austin President Greg Fenves said in a statement Sunday. “These events make it clear, now more than ever, that Confederate monuments have become symbols of modern white supremacy and neo-Nazism.”

Fenves said he spoke with faculty, students and alumni, and reviewed a 2015 task force report before making the decision.

The bronze monuments of Lee, Reagan and Johnston will be relocated to the school’s Briscoe Center for American History for scholarly study, Fenves said. The statues of Hogg, governor of Texas from 1891 to 1895, will be considered for re-installation at another campus site, he added.

“The University of Texas at Austin has a duty to preserve and study history,” Fenves said Sunday. “But our duty also compels us to acknowledge that those parts of our history that run counter to the university’s core values, the values of our state and the enduring values of our nation do not belong on pedestals in the heart of the Forty Acres.”

"We do not choose our history, but we choose what we honor and celebrate on our campus," he added.

The school removed statues of Jefferson Davis and U.S. President Woodrow Wilson from campus back in 2015 after a deadly mass shooting at a church in Charleston, South Carolina.

Other Confederate monuments are being removed around the country under pressure from those who consider them symbols of racism and white supremacy.

Four Confederate-era monuments were removed last week in Baltimore, Maryland, and the governors of Virginia and North Carolina requested the removal of Confederate monuments in their states.

President Donald Trump, however, has pushed back against removing the Confederate symbols, calling it "changing history."

“This week it's Robert E. Lee. I noticed that Stonewall Jackson is coming down. I wonder is it George Washington next week and is it Thomas Jefferson the week after? You know, you really do have to ask yourself, where does it stop?” Trump said in a press conference last week.

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ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Millions of people in the United States are expected to be within the path of today's total solar eclipse, when the moon moves between the sun and Earth and casts a dark shadow across our planet. But whether or not you see it depends entirely on clear skies.

ABC News meteorologists predict the Pacific Northwest and the Tennessee Valley will have the best weather conditions for viewing the total solar eclipse. There, cloud cover is expected to be less than 25 percent and, in some areas, there will be no clouds at all.


The lunar shadow will reach the West Coast at 9:05 a.m. PT. People in Lincoln City, Oregon, will be the first in the continental United States to view the total phase, which starts there at 10:15 a.m. PT. But the marine layer as well as smoke from nearby wild fires have the potential to obscure the astronomical event for those along Oregon's coast.

"Of course we need clear skies and currently along the coastline we are battling that marine layer as you often do. The other issue in Oregon, smoke from wildfires that have been burning," ABC News senior meteorologist Rob Marciano said on "Good Morning America" while reporting from Lincoln City. "The rest of the Northwest looks to be really nice."


The main areas of concern for cloudy skies is in the central United States and along the Southeast coast. A weather system developing in the middle of the country will impact eclipse visibility in parts of Kansas, Nebraska, Iowa and Missouri. ABC News meteorologists expect at least 60 percent of the sky to be covered with clouds over this region. People in western to northern Missouri, including Kansas City, can expect cloudy skies.

"You get into the central part of the U.S. and we're looking at a developing system that will probably throw some clouds into Nebraska, into Missouri," Marciano said.


ABC News meteorologists also anticipate some clouds as well as possible isolated and brief thunderstorms to develop along the coast of South Carolina and Georgia. It's unlikely that this weather activity won't clear out by early afternoon. But if the system lingers, parts of this region, including Charleston, will have poor viewing conditions for the total solar eclipse.


Here is ABC News' current forecast for locations within or near the path of totality:

  • Lincoln City, Oregon: Patchy morning with fog and clouds, then becoming sunny; temperatures in the 50s.
  • Madras, Oregon: Clear skies; temperatures nearing the low 80s.
  • Ketchum, Idaho: Clear skies; temperatures in the 70s.
  • Idaho Falls, Idaho: Mostly clear skies; temperatures nearing the low 80s.
  • Casper, Wyoming: Just a few clouds and some smoke, but mostly clear skies; temperatures near 80.
  • The Sand Hills, Nebraska: Isolated thunderstorms with possible periods of clear skies; temperatures in the 80s.
  • Beatrice, Nebraska: Partly cloudy with isolated thunderstorms and periods of sunny skies; temperatures in the 80s.
  • St. Joseph, Missouri: Mostly cloudy with isolated thunderstorms; heat index in the 90s.
  • Carbondale, Illinois: Partly cloudy; any storms should hold off until after the eclipse; heat index in the 90s.
  • Kelly, Kentucky: Mostly clear skies; heat index in the 90s.
  • Nashville, Tennessee: Mostly clear skies; heat index in the 90s.
  • Atlanta, Georgia: Mostly sunny; heat index in 90s.
  • Columbia, South Carolina: Isolated thunderstorms with periods of clear skies; heat index in the 90s.
  • Charleston, South Carolina: A chance of showers and thunderstorms with periods of cloudiness; heat index in the 90s.


Beginning Monday at 10 a.m. PT/1 p.m. ET, ABC News' David Muir will lead the network's live coverage of the celestial phenomenon. ABC News has crews spread across the path of totality for the big event.

ABC News' Daniel Manzo contributed to this report.

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Erik Millsap(STERLING HEIGHTS, Mich.) -- A 1-year-old girl thought she spotted her dad in the mall. Instead, it was a statue of Batman.

Melissa Millsap was taking her four kids back-to-school shopping at Lakeside Mall in Sterling Heights, Michigan, but she couldn't understand why her 1-year-old daughter Layla kept yelling, "Da da!"

"I was trying to figure out what she was talking about," she told ABC News.

Millsap, 37, eventually discovered that her daughter was referring to the Batman statue, located inside the mall.

"It's funny because she's never seen Batman before. We don't have anything Batman in our house," she continued.

Millsap decided to take a video of her daughter yelling "Da da!" at Batman to send to her husband of 17 years, Erik. He thought it was hilarious.

"I was cracking up because the way she shot it was perfect," Erik Millsap, 39, told ABC News. "I was not expecting to see Batman at the end of the video. I was laughing."

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Tim Vorderstrasse(WASHINGTON) -- A new mother of two decided to take a fresh approach on pregnancy posts by showing the honest and sometimes humorous side of what it's really like to be pregnant.

Exactly two months after the birth of her first daughter, Zoey, Maya Vorderstrasse found out she was pregnant with another baby girl. "I was in absolute shock," Vorderstrasse told ABC News.

But the new mother took it in stride and started posting pictures on Instagram of her new baby bump.

"Up until about halfway through the pregnancy I was still taking pretty pictures, but I would try and insert a relatable caption," she said of her initial idea to flip the switch on her typical mommy-to-be posts. "But then it came to a point where I said, 'I'm way too tired and hurting. I can't pretend it's this amazing feeling all the time.' It's hard, I was achy and I had my other child crawling and I felt [like a] fake portraying something that just wasn't my reality.”

So she decided to instead embrace the reality of it all and post things to which other pregnant women could actually relate.

"I said, 'I'm going to embrace my life right now and see what happens, see how people respond.’"

Vorderstrasse used a plain and simple letter board to post messages about how she was feeling week to week.

"I was paying attention to my symptoms and then took the strongest one and turned it into a board," she explained. "I translated how I was feeling into a message."

Her husband, Tim, who photographed her series of shots, became the brunt of one post at 33 weeks when she got upset because he ate the last cookie out of a package of cookies.

"When my first one went viral and got over 6,000 ‘likes,’ the one where I'm [fake] choking my husband because he took my food, that was the one that made me realize how much people like these and could relate," Vorderstrasse said. "People were messaging me saying, 'Oh, my gosh, that's exactly how I feel. Thank you for being so honest about that.' They feel like it's OK to not have it all together and these other moms felt like they belonged somewhere reading my posts."

Ultimately, the pregnancy shots finished with the Aug. 3 birth of daughter Hazel but she still plans to continue posting pics that are both fun and honest.

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ABC News.(ST. JOSEPH, Mo.) -- Newlyweds Samantha and Cameron Kuhn had an out-of-this-world wedding today during the total solar eclipse. They celebrated with their closest friends and family in the path of totality in St. Joseph, Missouri.

“Being able to do the wedding on the day of the solar eclipse couldn’t be any more perfect,” bride Samantha Kuhn, 28, told ABC News.

After completing their vows, the bride and groom joined their guests, all wearing certified solar eclipse glasses, in a field behind the altar to take in another “rare and wonderful” occasion -- the total solar eclipse.

“I’ll go out and have about 2 minutes and 40 seconds of totality and just take in that moment,” the bride said on “Good Morning America” this morning in anticipation of the ceremony. “It’s going to be amazing.”

The astronomy-loving bride has been obsessed with all things celestial since she was in the third grade, even wanting to become an astronaut.

“Once I realized the planets were out there and we were all suspended in this solar system, I couldn’t wrap my head around it but I loved that. It completely fascinated me,” she told ABC News.

So when her now-husband Cameron Kuhn popped the question, picking the day was a no brainer.

“The coolest part about this, the eclipse is kind of like a time stamp,” the groom said. “It will stand out in everybody’s memories even more.”

The wedding had heavenly touches and an outer space motif including DIY “galaxy globe” centerpieces -- similar to snow globes, but full of glitter instead -- for the reception tables.

While the wedding party waited for the total eclipse to happen, they listened to instrumental music that “kind of sounds space soundtrack-y,” said the bride.

She also sported a magical braid to show off her galaxy-colored hair of blue and fuchsia hues.

And she couldn’t walk down the aisle without her space-themed high heels, also planning ahead with matching lace-up flats to dance the night away at the reception.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- From Oregon to South Carolina, a total solar eclipse on Monday will darken the sky as it arcs across the contiguous United States.

A total solar eclipse is when the moon moves between the sun and Earth, an occurrence that lasts up to three hours from beginning to end. Monday's total solar eclipse is particularly rare because it's the first time in 99 years that the path of totality exclusively crosses the continental United States from coast to coast. It's also the first continent-wide eclipse to be visible only from the United States since 1776.

The last time the contiguous United States saw a total solar eclipse was Feb. 26, 1979, when the path of totality crossed the Pacific Northwest. ABC News' Frank Reynolds anchored a special report on the celestial phenomenon at the time and pledged that the network would cover the next total solar eclipse in 2017.

"So that's it -- the last solar eclipse to be seen on this continent in this century. And as I said not until Aug. 21, 2017, will another eclipse be visible from North America. That's 38 years from now. May the shadow of the moon fall on a world in peace. ABC News, of course, will bring you a complete report on that next eclipse 38 years from now,"  Reynolds said before signing off.

On Monday, starting at 10 a.m. PT/1 p.m. ET, ABC News' David Muir will lead the network's live coverage of the astronomical event from within the path of totality.

You must be in the path of totality to witness a total solar eclipse. NASA estimates more than 300 million people in the United States could potentially view the total solar eclipse in its entirety.

However, a partial solar eclipse will be visible in every U.S. state. In fact, everyone in North America, as well as parts of South America, Africa and Europe, will see at least a partial eclipse, according to NASA.

The path of totality for the Aug. 21 solar eclipse is a 70-mile-wide ribbon that will cross the United States from west to east, sweeping over portions of 14 U.S. states: Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Montana, Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina.

The moon's shadow will start to eclipse the sun over the West Coast just after 9 a.m. PT. From there, the moon's shadow will speed across the country and leave the East Coast just after 4 p.m. ET.

The exact times for partial and total phases of Monday's eclipse vary depending on your location.

With millions of people expected to pour into the select U.S. cities located within the path of totality, law enforcement, emergency personnel and hospitals there are on high alert.

"It's all hands on deck," Kentucky's Madisonville Police Chief Wade Williams told ABC News. "We're kind of throwing everything at it."

The state of Oregon alone is anticipating a million visitors Monday, causing some local hospitals to cancel elective surgeries and call in extra help for the emergency rooms. Some cities even preemptively declared a state of disaster, a move that allows them to call in the National Guard to help direct the large crowds if needed.

"If a police department in a certain area is overwhelmed and they need us to help come and set up traffic control check points, we're ready to do that," Oregon National Guard spokesperson Leslie Reed told ABC News.

More than than 17,000 cars and SUVs have already been rented for Monday at Oregon's Portland International Airport, a number it normally hits over an entire week.

In northeast Georgia, the mountain town of Blairsville is expecting to host up to 200 percent more people than the number of residents who live there. The town's hotels are fully booked and camping sites are sold out.

"There is no reason to panic," Blairsville-Union County Chamber of Commerce tourism director Tobie Chandler told ABC News. "We are not going to run out of gas, we are not going to run out of groceries. We just need to enjoy this event."

The American Red Cross has set up resources along the path of totality to help keep people safe during Monday's rare celestial event.

"One thing is we really encourage folks to have in their cars an emergency go kit and that should include things like water, non-perishable foods, a flashlight with batteries and an envelope with cash," Josh Lockwood, regional CEO for the American Red Cross Greater New York region, told ABC News.

Authorities warned that people might have to look for landlines in some areas to make emergency phone calls, as some small towns may not be able to handle the large number of cellphone calls.

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ABC News.(GREENVILLE, S.C.) -- A baby girl born today in South Carolina, hours before the total solar eclipse, has been legally named Eclipse.

Eclipse Alizabeth Eubanks came into the world at 8:04 a.m. weighing 6 pounds, 3 ounces and measuring 19 inches long, Greenville Memorial Hospital in Greenville, South Carolina, confirmed to ABC News.

The child's mother, Freedom Reid of Spartanville, was not due to deliver until September 3, she said.

"I kind of felt like it was meant to happen, to have her on this day," Reid said when asked about giving birth on eclipse day.

South Carolina is one of the 14 U.S. states that falls in the path of totality, a 70-mile-wide ribbon that will cross the country from west to east. Reid, now a mom of two, said she had plans to watch today's eclipse with her eldest daughter, but went into labor around midnight.

Hours later, Eclipse arrived. Parents Reid and Michael Eubanks originally planned to name her Violet.

Reid said her family was first "shocked" over the baby's unique name, but now thinks it was a great idea.

"I think it was just meant to be, her name," she added. "We're probably going to call her Clipsey."

Eclipse joins big sister Grayson, 2. Greenville Memorial Hospital gave the newborn a total solar eclipse onesie. So far, 11 babies who were born on Aug. 21 at Greenville received the souvenir outfit.

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ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Monday's total solar eclipse will come to Americans in varying degrees of visual clarity, according to ABC News meteorologists, who say that the clearest skies are likely to appear in the Northwest in cities like San Francisco, Salem and Seattle.

New York, and parts of the Tennessee Valley, around Nashville, are also more likely to have unobstructed viewing of the phenomenon.

Some cloud cover is expected in parts of the Midwest, according to ABC News meteorologists path of totality -- namely states like Kansas, Missouri and Iowa.

The Southeast coast of the U.S. -- from North Carolina to Georgia -- is among the areas in danger of enduring cloud cover during the eclipse.

NASA has published an interactive map that shows the times for the partial and total eclipse anywhere in world. The path of totality crosses over portions of many major cities.

What happens during a total solar eclipse?

During a total solar eclipse, the lunar shadow will darken the sky and temperatures will drop, while bright stars and planets will appear at a time that is normally broad daylight.

Retired NASA astrophysicist and photographer Fred Espenak said the experience usually lasts for just a couple minutes, but it's truly out of this world.

"It is unlike any other experience you've ever had," Espenak, popularly known as Mr. Eclipse, told ABC News. "It's a visceral experience; you feel it. The hair on your arms, on the back of your neck, stand up. You get goosebumps.

"You have to be there," he added.

Espenak said the rare and striking astronomical event can last as long as seven minutes. For the Aug. 21 eclipse, NASA anticipates the longest period when the moon obscures the sun's entire surface from any given location along its path will last about two minutes and 40 seconds.

Some animals may react strangely to the celestial phenomenon. Rick Schwartz, an animal behavior expert with the San Diego Zoo, said there have been observations of animals going to sleep during total solar eclipses.

"The animals take the visual cues of the light dimming, and the temperature cues," Schwartz told ABC News.

"You hear the increase of bird calls and insects that you usually associate with nightfall," he added. "Farmers have said that the cows lay down on the field or the chickens go back into the coop."

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Chicago Police(CHICAGO) -- The Northwestern University professor and Oxford University financial officer accused of fatally stabbing the professor's boyfriend in a Chicago high-rise allegedly committed the crime as part of a sexual fantasy hatched online, prosecutors said on Sunday.

Wyndham Lathem, who was a faculty member at Northwestern's microbiology-immunology department for 10 years, and a second suspect, University of Oxford employee Andrew Warren, were both taken into custody without incident in Northern California on August 4 after a nationwide manhunt.

Lathem, 43, and Warren spent more than one week on the run after allegedly killing 26-year-old hairstylist Trenton Cornell-Duranleau, who was found stabbed to death at a Chicago apartment registered to Lathem on July 27. At a press conference this afternoon, police described the scene as "savage and grizzly."

Cornell-Duranleau was Lathem's boyfriend, Officer Eddie Johnson, Superintendent of Police with the Chicago Police Department said at a press conference on Sunday.

The two suspects in Cornell-Duranleau's murder met on the internet, Chicago Police Commander Brendan Deenihan said this afternoon, and Warren came to the U.S. to meet Latham.

Deenihan said on Sunday that on July 27, doorman at Lathem's building received an anonymous call that a crime may have been committed on the premises. Corenell's body was soon discovered with multiple stab wounds. Two knives, one of which was broken, were found at the scene.

Witnesses say they heard what sounded like a fight at 5 a.m., according to Deenihan.

Latham, who police say was staying in a hotel close to his apartment building, had picked up Warren at Chicago's O'Hare airport several days before the alleged crime took place. Police said that surveillance footage from the apartment and hotel area at the time captured Lathem in the area with Cornell.

According to police, while Lathem was on the run, he sent a video message to various friends and family members apologizing for his alleged involvement in the killing. Lathem had described the killing as the biggest mistake of his life, according to Chicago police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi.

Guglielmi also said the two suspects donated $1,000 in the victim’s name to the public library in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. Police said Sunday that it is unclear why that library location was chosen.

Lathem, who has been a faculty member at Northwestern's microbiology-immunology department for 10 years, has been banned from entering the school, according to Alan Cubbage, Northwestern University vice president for university relations.

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- The weekend after a white nationalist rally collapsed into chaos in Charlottesville, Virginia, leading to the alleged murder of an anti-racism activist, protests erupted across the country against white supremacy, racism and the presence of Confederate monuments.

Boston, Massachusetts

Tens of thousands counterprotesting a rally purporting to be about free speech swarmed Boston on Saturday, leading to a few conflicts with police and widespread attention from traditional and social media.

A total of 33 arrests were made Saturday in Boston, primarily resulting from disorderly conduct and alleged assaults against police officers, the Boston Police Department said. Police indicated that some demonstrators were throwing rocks and bottles of urine, but that did not represent the majority of participants, according to Police Commissioner William Evans.

"99.9 percent of the people here were for the right reasons" and participated peacefully, Evans said.

Dallas, Texas

Thousands of demonstrators gathered around the area of Dallas City Hall Saturday at a rally calling for unity, according to ABC affiliate WFAA-TV.

More than a dozen activists, politicians and faith leaders spoke prior to a candlelight vigil, the affiliate reported.

Tensions were high near Confederate War Memorial Park, where calls have been growing to remove statues commemorating Civil War veterans who fought for the Confederacy, WFAA-TV reported.

Cotton candy and caramel apples for sale for $3 in the middle of this protest against Dallas' Confederate War Memorial. pic.twitter.com/SdWNhGmTP1

— Jason Whitely (@JasonWhitely) August 20, 2017


Monuments commemorating the Confederacy on public land "must be and will be removed," Dallas Mayor Dwaine Caraway said at a Friday press conference, which featured black members of Dallas's City Council, according to the Dallas Morning News.

Kevin Felder, one of the City Council members, said "taxpayer dollars should not support vestiges of racism and white supremacy," in reference to the statues, while speaking at Friday's press conference.

Five people were detained during Saturday’s rally and then released without charges, the Dallas Police Department told ABC News.

Memphis, Tennessee

Six demonstrators were arrested in Memphis following a rally to remove a monument to Nathan Bedford Forrest, a slave trader and lieutenant general who served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War, according to ABC affiliate WATN-TV.

The monument has become a flashpoint of tension between anti-racism activists, who covered it with anti-racist signs on Saturday, and those who seek to protect the history of the Confederacy.

Gene Andrews, a caretaker for Nathan Bedford Forrest's boyhood home and a participant in the white nationalist rally that took place in Charlottesville last week, told the Tennessean newspaper that tensions over the monuments were building.

"I think people have had enough," Andrews told the paper. "Somewhere there’s going to be a line drawn. And if it’s a war that’s coming, so be it."

Our beloved @tamisawyer and other activists calling on @MayorMemphis remove Confederate statues. #TakeEmDown901 pic.twitter.com/bwjtTmEimp

— Broderick Greer (@BroderickGreer) August 16, 2017

Atlanta, Georgia

Hundreds of groups gathered in Centennial Olympic Park on Saturday in Atlanta to march against racism and hate, according to ABC affiliate WSB-TV.

The march ended at the tomb of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the affiliate reported.

Hundreds of anti-racism marchers quietly filing into Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site in Atlanta. #Charlottesville pic.twitter.com/gTApyUpWbI

— Rikki Klaus (@RikkiKlausWSB) August 20, 2017

Indianapolis, Indiana

Anthony Ventura, a 30-year-old man, was arrested after police said he damaged the Confederate statue with a hammer, according to ABC affiliate WRTV.

Laguna Beach, California

In Laguna Beach on Saturday, a group of about 300 demonstrators met for a pre-emptive response to a far-right rally planned for that day, the Los Angeles Times reported. At the rally, participants planned to call attention to victims of crimes committed by immigrants living in the U.S. illegally.

Thank you to Saturday's rally at Main Beach for staying peaceful while expressing your First Amendment rights. #LagunaBeach pic.twitter.com/mufznrEBIL

— Laguna Beach Police (@LagunaBeachPD) August 19, 2017

Saturday’s gathering of counterprotesters, which was set up to show solidarity and strength, was officially called “From Charlottesville to Laguna Beach: We Stand Together.” Laguna Beach Mayor Toni Iseman helped organize the event and spoke to the crowd on Saturday, the Los Angeles Times reported.

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images(PALM BEACH, Fla.) -- A number of high-profile charitable organizations have withdrawn fundraising events and galas from President Trump's Mar-a-Lago club in Palm Beach, Florida, amid growing backlash against the president's response to the deadly violence that broke out in Charlottesville.

The Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach announced on Saturday that it was pulling out of an event at Mar-a-Lago. "The Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach is a nonprofit dedicated to protecting and celebrating the unique architectural and cultural heritage of Palm Beach. Given the current environment surrounding Mar-a-Lago, we have made the decision to move our annual dinner dance," read a message on its Facebook page.

On Friday, the Susan G. Komen Foundation, the American Red Cross and the Salvation Army all confirmed to ABC News that they are no longer going to be holding their fundraising events at Mar-a-Lago this upcoming year.

“The Salvation Army relies heavily on fundraising events like The Holiday Snow Ball in Palm Beach to further our mission of helping those in need through a range of social services including food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, clothing and shelter for the homeless, and opportunities for the underprivileged," the Salvation Army wrote in a statement, "Because the conversation has shifted away from the purpose of this event, we will not host it at Mar-a-Lago.”

On Thursday, the American Cancer Society -- which has held events at Mar-a-Lago since 2009 -- along with the Cleveland Clinic, both announced they were pulling fundraising events scheduled at the club for next year.

"Our values and commitment to diversity are critical as we work to address the impact of cancer in every community. It has become increasingly clear that the challenge to those values is outweighing other business considerations," the American Cancer Society wrote in a statement.

These organizations join a growing list of groups that are changing the venues for their fundraising events, many saying they want to avoid being politicized.

The Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Leaders in Furthering Education (LIFE) have also said they are changing venues for events previously scheduled at Mar-a-Lago.

“America was founded on the principles of life, liberty and justice for all. In the 241 years since, millions of Americans of all religions, races, creeds, color, gender and sexual orientation have died -- and millions more have been disabled -- fighting to protect these values and freedoms. Now, however, our great nation is under siege by those who seek to undermine and obliterate these principles. Indeed, the hatred, vitriol, and anti-Semitic and racist views being spewed by neo-Nazis and white supremacists are repugnant and repulsive -- and they are antithetical to everything that this country, and I, personally stand for," Lois Pope, a philanthropist and veterans advocate who founded LIFE, wrote in a statement provided to ABC News.

Other groups that have pulled events from Mar-a-Lago include the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, American Friends of Magen David Adom and the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute.

The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society cited the security hassles of hosting an event at Mar-a-Lago as a reason for their switching venues.

Palm Beach Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Laurel Baker, who has been outspoken about organizations continuing to hold fundraising events at Mar-a-Lago, told ABC News: “I’ve been carrying around this quote with me for a while. It’s from Dante: ‘The darkest places in hell are reserved for those who maintain their neutrality in times of moral crisis.’ ”

Baker also told ABC News that she expects more and more organizations to pull events in the coming weeks, but that those decisions are best left up to the organizations themselves.

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Brent N. Clarke/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- The death of comedian and activist Dick Gregory at age 84 on Saturday prompted a flood of tributes on Twitter from celebrities, activists and others.

Jane Sanders recalled how her husband -- Bernie Sanders, Democratic senator from Vermont and former presidential candidate -- once spent a night in jail with Gregory after protesting segregation in Chicago.

RIP Dick Gregory, a good & brave man. He & @SenSanders spent the night in jail together for protesting Chicago segregated schools in the 60s https://t.co/pYpMU34eOx

— Jane O'Meara Sanders (@janeosanders) August 20, 2017

Democratic National Committee vice chairman Keith Ellison posted a photo of himself with Gregory. "Thank you for giving yourself to all of us," he wrote.

Dick Gregory, may God Bless you and Keep you. Thank you for giving yourself to all of us. pic.twitter.com/Z1dLIvYuBn

— Rep. Keith Ellison (@keithellison) August 20, 2017

Activist and writer Shaun King posted pictures of Gregory as a young man. "Rest in power, good sir," King wrote.

Because many of you probably only knew Dick Gregory as an older man, I wanted to show you these young images.

Rest in power good sir. pic.twitter.com/ZayInokcaJ

— Shaun King (@ShaunKing) August 20, 2017

Singer John Legend called Gregory a "groundbreaker in comedy and a voice for justice."

Dick Gregory lived an amazing, revolutionary life. A groundbreaker in comedy and a voice for justice. RIP

— John Legend (@johnlegend) August 20, 2017

Some people posted excerpts from Gregory's memoir, "Callous on My Soul," such as when he wrote about a waitress in the South telling him that they "don't serve colored people."

White lady: We don't serve colored people here.

Dick Gregory: I don't eat colored people. Bring me a whole fried chicken.

RIP Mr. Gregory😰 pic.twitter.com/t8dnuRJhBC

— Eugene Gu, MD (@eugenegu) August 20, 2017

Here is a sample of some other tweets paying tribute to Gregory and lamenting his passing.

Comedian Dick Gregory always told it like it is. Our laughter was fuel to fight for justice in an unjust world. RIP 1932-2017 pic.twitter.com/wpbdEkvny1

— Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson) August 20, 2017

Marching w/ King. Sitting w/ Ali. Paving the way for our comedic greats. All while fighting for us.

Rest well Dick Gregory. #blkcreatives pic.twitter.com/GsfRTjHSuy

— #blkcreatives netwrk (@blkcreatives) August 20, 2017

He taught us how to laugh. He taught us how to fight.He taught us how to live.Dick Gregory was committed to justice.I miss him already. #RIP pic.twitter.com/3CfpM2O17D

— Rev Jesse Jackson Sr (@RevJJackson) August 20, 2017

Rest In Peace to civil rights icon Dick Gregory. An inspiration. A hero. 🙏 pic.twitter.com/kIzeYMNjor

— Ricky Davila (@TheRickyDavila) August 20, 2017


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